u ought to know

Really, feeling this work….https://www.visualaids.org/artists/detail/christoph3r-c0nry 

Really, feeling this work….https://www.visualaids.org/artists/detail/christoph3r-c0nry 

After several years of amazing work as the Programs Manager at Visual AIDS, Ted Kerr will be stepping down from his positition to continue his studies at Union Theological Seminary in NYC. It’s with the greatest gratitude that we say goodbye for now (though we know we will continue to work together in new capacities.)  We wish him the best!
Meanwhile, Visual AIDS is looking to welcome a new Programs Manager who is dedicated and enthusiastic about using contemporary art to promote dialogues around issues of HIV/AIDS.  
See details below and please share widely:
Employment Opportunity: Programs Manager, Visual AIDS
Visual AIDS is a leading New York-based nonprofit arts organization which uses art to fight AIDS by provoking dialogue, supporting HIV-positive artists, and preserving the legacy of visual artists lost to AIDS. Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to HIV prevention and AIDS awareness through producing and presenting visual arts projects, while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS.
About the Opportunity:
Visual AIDS is looking for a Programs Manager who is deeply committed to using contemporary art to develop integral dialogues around issues of HIV/AIDS and social justice. The Programs Manager works with the Executive Director and Associate Director to implement programs to achieve the organization’s vision, mission, and goals, and is an essential part of the organization.
Responsibilities:
●  Develop and manage new and rotating programs that work towards theorganization’s mission and values.
●  Oversee all aspects of public programming, including exhibitions and events,publications and artist projects, community and artists outreach, deadlines, program budgets, press releases, and long-term planning.
●  Manage and update Visual AIDS online presence, including our website, blog, event calendar, web galleries, facebook, twitter, instagram and other social media sites.
● Support and cultivate all aspects of the Visual AIDS Artist Registry.
●  Develop relationships and work with artists, art institutions, HIV/AIDS organizations and other related groups to determine the needs of the community.
●  Maintain the organization’s culture of inclusion, openness, and respect with donors, board members, volunteers, artists, and audiences
Job Duties:
Program Development & Management– The Programs Manager produces new and ongoing programs, and works with existing partners while developing new relationships with artists and organizations, to help plan and execute annual exhibitions, public programs, publications, online features, and artist projects. The Visual AIDS Artist Registry serves as the core to all programming. The Program Manager works with the staff and organizing partners to arrange all elements of exhibitions, events, and publications including identifying and contacting artists, curators, panelist, designers, editors, printers, shippers, contract workers, and tech crew to insure smooth and timely operations of all events and projects.Management duties also include shipping, receiving, and installation of artworks for exhibitions; arranging venues, panelist, and recording of all public events; coordinating the production of publications and printed materials; developing time-lines and efficient scheduling for programs; and completing budget reports and invoices.The Programs Manger is responsible for the evaluation of all programs and reports back to the Executive Director.
Communications and Social Media - The Programs Manager uses social media to communicate the vision and work of Visual AIDS.This includes but is not limited to the following platforms: Visual AIDS website, emails, blog, event calendar, web galleries, Facebook, Tumblr, and Instagram. The Programs Manager produces and coordinates content for the Visual AIDS blog including interviews, guest writers and other posts. This work also includes using social media to promote and highlight the work of artist members such as upcoming exhibitions, artist talks, and related news.The Program Manager also invites and schedules individuals to guest curate monthly web galleries.The Programs Manager works with the Associate Director to write press releases and eblasts for all programs and runs press and communications by the Executive Director to ensure that all messages are on point.
Community Relations- The Programs Manager works to build connections between Visual AIDS and other related Arts and AIDS Service organizations through programming, communications and media. The Programs Manager assists curators, researchers, art historians and educators conducting research in the Archive Project & Artists Registry; reaches out to Visual AIDS artist members regarding program needs, and supports the Associate Director regarding any additional needs related to the Archive Project and Artist Registry, including the Materials Grant program.
Staff Management & Intern Recruitment – The Programs Manager supports the Associate Director in the management of part-time and contract staff including interns, volunteers, project managers, curators, and crew. The Programs Manager helps organize and schedule a rotating team of event and office volunteers, and regulates compliance with universities for student internships.
Qualifications:
The candidate must be a highly motivated individual who is a team player and enjoys the challenge of working on multiple projects simultaneously.They must be skilled at balancing long-term projects with day-to-day work, and be able to meet tight deadlines.The candidate must be a flexible, highly organized, have excellent communication and writing skills, and have a track record of managing successful programs and/or events. A strong network of NYC and national artists and/or HIV activists that can be drawn into the service of Visual AIDS mission is a plus. The successful candidate will combine these qualities with a commitment to the ideas expressed by Visual AIDS mission and program structure.
Knowledge and Education: 
Bachelor’s degree or 3-4 years of professional experience in related fields required
Experience within a nonprofit arts organization preferred
Background in Art History or Studio Arts preferred
Knowledge and understanding of current issues around HIV/AIDS preferred

Salary Range:
$32,000 - $36,000 (commensurate with experience) + comprehensive health benefits.

Visual AIDS Statement of Values:
In the fight against AIDS, Visual AIDS believes: Effective AIDS advocacy seeks to address the underlying and related issues that contribute to and exacerbate the pandemic, such as poverty, homophobia and racism; HIV/AIDS prevention is about harm reduction that is guided by science, not ideology; Our work affirms the visibility, dignity and rights of people living with HIV and AIDS; Visual AIDS promotes art that is public, inclusive and accessible; We draw from the deep history of art activism; Art that takes risks promotes and encourages reflection, dialogue and action; Art is our weapon of choice.
A not-for-profit, 501(c)(3), Visual AIDS for the Arts is an equal opportunity employer. People with disabilities; PLWHA; people of color; women; and lesbian, gay, transgender/gender non-conforming and bisexual people are encouraged to apply.
To Apply:
Send cover letter, resume and three references to Nelson Santos, Executive Director at nsantos@visualAIDS.org - subject line “Programs Director”

After several years of amazing work as the Programs Manager at Visual AIDS, Ted Kerr will be stepping down from his positition to continue his studies at Union Theological Seminary in NYC. It’s with the greatest gratitude that we say goodbye for now (though we know we will continue to work together in new capacities.)  We wish him the best!

Meanwhile, Visual AIDS is looking to welcome a new Programs Manager who is dedicated and enthusiastic about using contemporary art to promote dialogues around issues of HIV/AIDS.  

See details below and please share widely:

Employment Opportunity: Programs Manager, Visual AIDS

Visual AIDS is a leading New York-based nonprofit arts organization which uses art to fight AIDS by provoking dialogue, supporting HIV-positive artists, and preserving the legacy of visual artists lost to AIDS. Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to HIV prevention and AIDS awareness through producing and presenting visual arts projects, while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS.

About the Opportunity:

Visual AIDS is looking for a Programs Manager who is deeply committed to using contemporary art to develop integral dialogues around issues of HIV/AIDS and social justice. The Programs Manager works with the Executive Director and Associate Director to implement programs to achieve the organization’s vision, mission, and goals, and is an essential part of the organization.

Responsibilities:

●  Develop and manage new and rotating programs that work towards theorganization’s mission and values.

●  Oversee all aspects of public programming, including exhibitions and events,publications and artist projects, community and artists outreach, deadlines, program budgets, press releases, and long-term planning.

●  Manage and update Visual AIDS online presence, including our websiteblogevent calendarweb galleriesfacebooktwitterinstagram and other social media sites.

● Support and cultivate all aspects of the Visual AIDS Artist Registry.

●  Develop relationships and work with artists, art institutions, HIV/AIDS organizations and other related groups to determine the needs of the community.

●  Maintain the organization’s culture of inclusion, openness, and respect with donors, board members, volunteers, artists, and audiences

Job Duties:

Program Development & Management– The Programs Manager produces new and ongoing programs, and works with existing partners while developing new relationships with artists and organizations, to help plan and execute annual exhibitions, public programs, publications, online features, and artist projects. The Visual AIDS Artist Registry serves as the core to all programming. The Program Manager works with the staff and organizing partners to arrange all elements of exhibitions, events, and publications including identifying and contacting artists, curators, panelist, designers, editors, printers, shippers, contract workers, and tech crew to insure smooth and timely operations of all events and projects.Management duties also include shipping, receiving, and installation of artworks for exhibitions; arranging venues, panelist, and recording of all public events; coordinating the production of publications and printed materials; developing time-lines and efficient scheduling for programs; and completing budget reports and invoices.The Programs Manger is responsible for the evaluation of all programs and reports back to the Executive Director.

Communications and Social Media - The Programs Manager uses social media to communicate the vision and work of Visual AIDS.This includes but is not limited to the following platforms: Visual AIDS website, emails, blog, event calendar, web galleries, Facebook, Tumblr, and Instagram. The Programs Manager produces and coordinates content for the Visual AIDS blog including interviews, guest writers and other posts. This work also includes using social media to promote and highlight the work of artist members such as upcoming exhibitions, artist talks, and related news.The Program Manager also invites and schedules individuals to guest curate monthly web galleries.The Programs Manager works with the Associate Director to write press releases and eblasts for all programs and runs press and communications by the Executive Director to ensure that all messages are on point.

Community Relations- The Programs Manager works to build connections between Visual AIDS and other related Arts and AIDS Service organizations through programming, communications and media. The Programs Manager assists curators, researchers, art historians and educators conducting research in the Archive Project & Artists Registry; reaches out to Visual AIDS artist members regarding program needs, and supports the Associate Director regarding any additional needs related to the Archive Project and Artist Registry, including the Materials Grant program.

Staff Management & Intern Recruitment – The Programs Manager supports the Associate Director in the management of part-time and contract staff including interns, volunteers, project managers, curators, and crew. The Programs Manager helps organize and schedule a rotating team of event and office volunteers, and regulates compliance with universities for student internships.

Qualifications:

The candidate must be a highly motivated individual who is a team player and enjoys the challenge of working on multiple projects simultaneously.They must be skilled at balancing long-term projects with day-to-day work, and be able to meet tight deadlines.The candidate must be a flexible, highly organized, have excellent communication and writing skills, and have a track record of managing successful programs and/or events. A strong network of NYC and national artists and/or HIV activists that can be drawn into the service of Visual AIDS mission is a plus. The successful candidate will combine these qualities with a commitment to the ideas expressed by Visual AIDS mission and program structure.

Knowledge and Education: 

Bachelor’s degree or 3-4 years of professional experience in related fields required

Experience within a nonprofit arts organization preferred

Background in Art History or Studio Arts preferred

Knowledge and understanding of current issues around HIV/AIDS preferred

Salary Range:

$32,000 - $36,000 (commensurate with experience) + comprehensive health benefits.

Visual AIDS Statement of Values:

In the fight against AIDS, Visual AIDS believes: Effective AIDS advocacy seeks to address the underlying and related issues that contribute to and exacerbate the pandemic, such as poverty, homophobia and racism; HIV/AIDS prevention is about harm reduction that is guided by science, not ideology; Our work affirms the visibility, dignity and rights of people living with HIV and AIDS; Visual AIDS promotes art that is public, inclusive and accessible; We draw from the deep history of art activism; Art that takes risks promotes and encourages reflection, dialogue and action; Art is our weapon of choice.

A not-for-profit, 501(c)(3), Visual AIDS for the Arts is an equal opportunity employer. People with disabilities; PLWHA; people of color; women; and lesbian, gay, transgender/gender non-conforming and bisexual people are encouraged to apply.

To Apply:

Send cover letter, resume and three references to Nelson Santos, Executive Director at nsantos@visualAIDS.org - subject line “Programs Director”

Working on something: What is it to be positive? To be negative? How do we sort though the complexities of subjectivity within communities understood to be stigmatized by HIV even if individuals are not living with the virus? PrEP makes it clear that “positive” and “negative” are no longer enough; we need a spectrum of terms related to HIV that include negative, deeply impacted, status unknown, on PrEP, neutral, nebulous, undetectable, positive, and—in the case of Timothy Brown and the baby in Mississippi—post-cured/HIV positive. PrEP is a game changer saving lives, and has the capacity to improve life chances for those already living with HIV. To ensure this happens, we need meaningful engagement around PrEP from the full spectrum of people impacted by HIV and—taking cues from The Denver Principles and Womanism—privilege those living with HIV, not as an act of tokenism but as a starting point for more profound and urgent conversations.

7 disposable cameras later

Below is an excerpt of a conversation between academic Alexandra Juhasz and writer Ted Kerr about AIDS on Film. It began as a discussion about Dallas Buyers Club but quickly evolved. The passage below focuses on the role assemblage plays in current AIDS understanding as well as an attempt to try and understand the how the internet, and history factor into recent past images created by and for gay men. TK. Right, Dallas Buyers Club uses the same images but with no understanding that these signifiers have shifting and diverse meanings. In the film, there is an idea that AIDS is a thing, or a look, or one way of being (sick and weak and skinny), whereas for me, aside from my understanding that HIV is a virus, I function—even as an HIV-negative gay man—with an idea that AIDS is an assemblage: a constellation of things, processes, and experiences (including those of the past and present) having to live alongside and in connection with each other. It is this idea that allows Untitledto work that very same footage so differently. Instead of a talk Hodges was commissioned to give at Artspace in San Antonio on the billboard project of artist Felix Gonzalez Torres, he collaborated with Marques da Cruz and King to make this sixty-minute montage of found footage, ranging from news clips, activist video, avant-garde films, educational videos, and sitcoms, to put the viewer in Gonzalez-Torres’s “room” (yet another resonance to the private but political bedroom in the Your Nostalgia is Killing Me poster and in Irwin Swirnoff’s and Catherine Sallfield and Zoe Leonard’s films, yet to be discussed). I see the film as a people’s history of the last thirty years in America where AIDS is written as the core. It is a visualization of how one can see the violence, tenacity, and creativity of America through the lens of AIDS. But it is also a collection of moments, truths, images, and impacts that, when placed along side each other, add up to the ongoingness of AIDS.
AJ. While I readily agree that Untitled is an amazing use and depiction of the past of America, where AIDS (images) function as a key to our history, the video also focuses, almost entirely, upon the experience and images of gay men. It cuts through the archive, pulling certain threads into focus. In counterdistinction to the normative mode you described earlier where AIDS is never seen in our present, Hodges looks back and sees it everywhere. This is connected to what we were hoping to do at that time, when we were making these early images: to assert, representationally, that AIDS impacted all aspects of American life.
TK: What is interesting to me is Untitled’s assemblage of footage comes at a time when the technique is being used in many and various ways (queer and not so), most popularly in Lana Del Ray’s mainstream debut, Video Games(2011) and more intimately in Irwin Smirnoff’s film, he said. Smirnoff’s film slideshows a dreamy constellation of moments in one queer man’s life: a life full of desire, sickness, influence, memory, landscape, paranoia, and softness. It reminds me a of a moment in photography that began maybe ten years ago, best understood as coming after or being influenced by Nan Goldin, Wolfgang Tillmans, Cass Bird, Ryan McGinley, and Lina Scheynius and instigated by gay men born in the late Seventies and early Eighties who maybe did not grow up with the Internet, but grew into adulthood with it. It is best exemplified by photographers Quinnford and Scout (now Oisin Share and Colin Quinn), Zachary Ayotte, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Steven Beckley, the early filmwork of Jim Verburg (For a Relationship, 2007) and projects likeButt Magazine, Original Plumbing magazine, I Want Your Love (Travis Mathews, 2012), and Weekend (Andrew Haigh, 2011) and even the music video for Holopaw’s Dirty Boots (Adam Baran, 2014). For these artists, the feedback loop of themselves is rooted in images of the past, and present-day porn. The work they create and share is for them, their visual vocabulary, communicating a desire to be seen: here we are now, in all our sunburst erotic everydayness, in our banality and vulnerability. These are images of young men who are aware that they will be able to/can get married or fight in wars for their country; but most likely will not do either. Rather they are making breakfast, hanging out on the couch, staring at each other. They are trying to make sense of the world around them based on their own terms, the politic they find themselves in as young gay men. AIDS is part of this, and this is embodied in Swirnoff’s film where HIV/AIDS both frames and is erased into daily life.
he said gets to how/why assemblage, in terms of adjacencies, is such an important part of AIDS cultural production now. Swirnoff’s film is about adjacencies: photos of sunsets, car rides, album covers, handsome friends, body parts, vials of blood, medication, road trips, photos of old photos, people in his room, which all come up against each other while the words “He says I don’t want you to be afraid of your body” play over the top.
AJ: This is a similar construction to Rock Hudson’s Home Movies, a much earlier intervention into the AIDS home-movie landscape, where Mark Rappaport also assembles movie footage, again of Hudson, into adjacencies by substituting these public images for the gay home movies that could never have been taken, all the while writing himself into the picture (as did Vargas) and then speaking his overt analysis about homophobia, HIV/AIDS politics, and gay images on to these images. Swirnoff is the lucky queer son who need not hide in (nor be uncloseted from) his own home movies.
TK: Yes, and his is a film about AIDS, and the inheritance of gay men born after the start of the epidemic in other ways, too. Many feel plagued by the plague that is now at a remove (given that HIV, as we discussed, is not part of their everyday lives as it might have been if they were born fifteen years earlier), and yet a fear of the body and what it can transmit lingers as a trace of another time and other deaths: the oppression that would have existed without HIV/AIDS is articulated through HIV/AIDS and its absence.
Films like Swirnoff’s that are about an embodied and integrated life with HIV in the present are few and far between. The film powerfully and beautifully illustrates the ways in which, even coming of age within the second silence, AIDS remains a preoccupation. AIDS is. And yet, silence accumulates and overwhelms.
There is a common refrain in the HIV/AIDS community that young people don’t talk, think, or know about AIDS. But that isn’t true. It is just communicated in ways that may not be recognizable or legible to those who come from, or need, a more visible experience of AIDS and its activism. But this, too, is changing, in part through AIDS Emergence. Read the article in full: http://www.cineaste.com/articles/aids-article

Below is an excerpt of a conversation between academic Alexandra Juhasz and writer Ted Kerr about AIDS on Film. It began as a discussion about Dallas Buyers Club but quickly evolved. 

The passage below focuses on the role assemblage plays in current AIDS understanding as well as an attempt to try and understand the how the internet, and history factor into recent past images created by and for gay men. 

TK. Right, Dallas Buyers Club uses the same images but with no understanding that these signifiers have shifting and diverse meanings. In the film, there is an idea that AIDS is a thing, or a look, or one way of being (sick and weak and skinny), whereas for me, aside from my understanding that HIV is a virus, I function—even as an HIV-negative gay man—with an idea that AIDS is an assemblage: a constellation of things, processes, and experiences (including those of the past and present) having to live alongside and in connection with each other. It is this idea that allows Untitledto work that very same footage so differently. Instead of a talk Hodges was commissioned to give at Artspace in San Antonio on the billboard project of artist Felix Gonzalez Torres, he collaborated with Marques da Cruz and King to make this sixty-minute montage of found footage, ranging from news clips, activist video, avant-garde films, educational videos, and sitcoms, to put the viewer in Gonzalez-Torres’s “room” (yet another resonance to the private but political bedroom in the Your Nostalgia is Killing Me poster and in Irwin Swirnoff’s and Catherine Sallfield and Zoe Leonard’s films, yet to be discussed). I see the film as a people’s history of the last thirty years in America where AIDS is written as the core. It is a visualization of how one can see the violence, tenacity, and creativity of America through the lens of AIDS. But it is also a collection of moments, truths, images, and impacts that, when placed along side each other, add up to the ongoingness of AIDS.

AJ. While I readily agree that Untitled is an amazing use and depiction of the past of America, where AIDS (images) function as a key to our history, the video also focuses, almost entirely, upon the experience and images of gay men. It cuts through the archive, pulling certain threads into focus. In counterdistinction to the normative mode you described earlier where AIDS is never seen in our present, Hodges looks back and sees it everywhere. This is connected to what we were hoping to do at that time, when we were making these early images: to assert, representationally, that AIDS impacted all aspects of American life.

TK: What is interesting to me is Untitled’s assemblage of footage comes at a time when the technique is being used in many and various ways (queer and not so), most popularly in Lana Del Ray’s mainstream debut, Video Games(2011) and more intimately in Irwin Smirnoff’s film, he said. Smirnoff’s film slideshows a dreamy constellation of moments in one queer man’s life: a life full of desire, sickness, influence, memory, landscape, paranoia, and softness. It reminds me a of a moment in photography that began maybe ten years ago, best understood as coming after or being influenced by Nan Goldin, Wolfgang Tillmans, Cass Bird, Ryan McGinley, and Lina Scheynius and instigated by gay men born in the late Seventies and early Eighties who maybe did not grow up with the Internet, but grew into adulthood with it. It is best exemplified by photographers Quinnford and Scout (now Oisin Share and Colin Quinn), Zachary Ayotte, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Steven Beckley, the early filmwork of Jim Verburg (For a Relationship, 2007) and projects likeButt MagazineOriginal Plumbing magazine, I Want Your Love (Travis Mathews, 2012), and Weekend (Andrew Haigh, 2011) and even the music video for Holopaw’s Dirty Boots (Adam Baran, 2014). For these artists, the feedback loop of themselves is rooted in images of the past, and present-day porn. The work they create and share is for them, their visual vocabulary, communicating a desire to be seen: here we are now, in all our sunburst erotic everydayness, in our banality and vulnerability. These are images of young men who are aware that they will be able to/can get married or fight in wars for their country; but most likely will not do either. Rather they are making breakfast, hanging out on the couch, staring at each other. They are trying to make sense of the world around them based on their own terms, the politic they find themselves in as young gay men. AIDS is part of this, and this is embodied in Swirnoff’s film where HIV/AIDS both frames and is erased into daily life.

he said gets to how/why assemblage, in terms of adjacencies, is such an important part of AIDS cultural production now. Swirnoff’s film is about adjacencies: photos of sunsets, car rides, album covers, handsome friends, body parts, vials of blood, medication, road trips, photos of old photos, people in his room, which all come up against each other while the words “He says I don’t want you to be afraid of your body” play over the top.

AJ: This is a similar construction to Rock Hudsons Home Movies, a much earlier intervention into the AIDS home-movie landscape, where Mark Rappaport also assembles movie footage, again of Hudson, into adjacencies by substituting these public images for the gay home movies that could never have been taken, all the while writing himself into the picture (as did Vargas) and then speaking his overt analysis about homophobia, HIV/AIDS politics, and gay images on to these images. Swirnoff is the lucky queer son who need not hide in (nor be uncloseted from) his own home movies.

TK: Yes, and his is a film about AIDS, and the inheritance of gay men born after the start of the epidemic in other ways, too. Many feel plagued by the plague that is now at a remove (given that HIV, as we discussed, is not part of their everyday lives as it might have been if they were born fifteen years earlier), and yet a fear of the body and what it can transmit lingers as a trace of another time and other deaths: the oppression that would have existed without HIV/AIDS is articulated through HIV/AIDS and its absence.

Films like Swirnoff’s that are about an embodied and integrated life with HIV in the present are few and far between. The film powerfully and beautifully illustrates the ways in which, even coming of age within the second silence, AIDS remains a preoccupation. AIDS is. And yet, silence accumulates and overwhelms.

There is a common refrain in the HIV/AIDS community that young people don’t talk, think, or know about AIDS. But that isn’t true. It is just communicated in ways that may not be recognizable or legible to those who come from, or need, a more visible experience of AIDS and its activism. But this, too, is changing, in part through AIDS Emergence. 

Read the article in full: http://www.cineaste.com/articles/aids-article

jemthemovie:

Are you ready to meet the band? Introducing Our Holograms:


Jem - Aubrey Peeples
Kimber - Stefanie Scott
Aja - Hayley Kiyoko
Shana - Aurora Perrineau

jemthemovie:

Are you ready to meet the band? Introducing Our Holograms:

Jem - Aubrey Peeples

Kimber - Stefanie Scott

Aja - Hayley Kiyoko

Shana - Aurora Perrineau

toronto